Sunshine Shibas

The talking dogs that you just got to love! 

 
 
 

INFORMATION ABOUT SHIBA INUS

 

Did you know?

Shiba Inus have lived with the Japanese people for centuries. Considered the smallest and oldest of Japan's dogs, the Shiba's ability to maneuver steep hills and mountain slopes, together with its keen senses, have repeatedly shown it to be a superb hunting dog.

After reaching near extinction during World War II, only three Shiba bloodlines remained. They were the San In Shiba, Mino Shiba and the Shin Shu Shiba, the latter being the most popular. It is from these three lines that the breed evolved into the modern Shiba.

In 1954 the first Shiba was documented as arriving in the U.S. The dog was brought from Japan by an American armed services family.

 

More information about Shiba Inus


General Appearance
The Shiba is the smallest of the Japanese native breeds of dog and was originally developed for hunting by sight and scent in the dense undergrowth of Japan's mountainous areas. Alert and agile with keen senses, he is also an excellent watchdog and companion. His frame is compact with well-developed muscles. Males and females are distinctly different in appearance: males are masculine without coarseness, females are feminine without weakness of structure.

Size, Proportion
Males 14 inches to 16 inches at withers. Females 13 inches to 15 inches. Average weight is approximately 23-30 pounds for males, 17-25 pounds for females. Males have a height to length ratio of 10 to 11, females slightly longer.

Coat
The Shiba Inu's coat is somewhat soft, thick and plush to the touch. Double coated with the outer coat being stiff and straight and the undercoat soft and thick. Fur is short and even on face, ears, and legs. Guard hairs stand off the body are about 1 to 2 inches in length at the withers. Tail hair is slightly longer and stands open in a brush.

Color
Urajiro (cream to white ventral color).

Reds (bright orange-red with urajiro lending a foxlike appearance to dogs of this color).

Black with tan points and urajiro.

Sesame (black-tipped hairs on a rich red background) with urajiro.

Temperament
A spirited boldness, a good nature, and an unaffected forthrightness, which together yield dignity and natural beauty. The Shiba has an independent nature and can be reserved toward strangers but is loyal and affectionate to those who earn his respect. The Shiba Inu may seem slightly aloof at first, but it is typically an inquisitive, good-natured, bright and active dog.

 

Shiba Inu History


The Shiba Inu has been with the Japanese people for centuries. They are considered the smallest and oldest of Japan's dogs. The ability of these dogs to maneuver through steep hills and mountain slopes, together with their keen senses, have repeatedly shown the Shiba to be a superb hunting dog.

The ancestors of today's Shibas were those hardy survivors of Japan's mountainous regions which are very difficult for men to penetrate. Although they were originally used to hunt large game, they currently used for small. They make an excellent watchdog and have established themselves as the number one companion dog in Japan. They can be seen throughout Japan in the cities, suburbs and countryside's.

There have been many stories on how the Shiba came about its name. Some are of the opinion that the name Shiba Inu was given because of its skill in going freely through the brushwood bushes. You will hear people refer to the Shiba as the Little Brushwood Dog. Another story has it that the other meaning of the Japanese word "Shiba" is small, therefore, this name has also been attached to these dogs. None of these stories however, have been validated. What is valid is this small dog called Shiba first came by its name in approximately the 1920s. In December of 1936, through the Cultural Properties Act, the Shiba was designated as a precious natural product of the Japanese nation. Thus, the breed was given official recognition.

Most of the Shibas being shown in the 1930s came from the Yamanashi or San In areas. These dogs were brought down from the mountains to the more populated areas. As they had been used mostly for hunting, their appearance was somewhat different from the Shiba today. They were large boned and rough looking, unlike the elegant Shibas you now see.

After reaching near extinction during World War II, those Shibas remaining were from three different bloodlines. They were the San In Shiba, Mino Shiba, and the Shin Shu Shiba, the last being the most popular in Japan past and present. It is from these three lines the Shiba has evolved into the breed you see in and out of the ring.

The first documented Shiba in the United States was in 1954. It was brought from Japan by an American armed service family. In the late seventies Americans started to import the Shiba for breeding. The first litter born in the United States was 1979. The sire and dam were imports owned by Julia Cadwell.

 

 

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